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#EqHist2018: Kit Heintzman on “Whose horses matter?”

#EqHist2018

Equine History Collective

All month long we will be featuring speaker’s abstracts for the upcoming Equine History Conference: Why Equine History Matters. Register now!

Whose horses matter?
Kit Heintzman, Harvard University

   Thousands of sick horses were brought to the École Royale Vétérinaire de Paris since it opened in 1766 to receive treatment, but few of them were ever referred by name in medical writing. This paper compares three genres of medical writing among eighteenth-century French veterinarians during the first 25 years of the hospital’s existence: the published account of treatment interventions, the hospital’s individualized treatment report, and the autopsy record. Such works reveal distinct ways of fashioning the meaning and importance of animal death in the early decades of state-supported of veterinary medicine. In the published reports, animal death was reduced to mere numbers, and became a mechanism to convey information about the state of veterinary practice, but not about the animals…

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#EqHist2018: Abbie Harlow on “The Use of Burros and Mules in Defining Race”

#EqHist2018

Equine History Collective

All month long we will be featuring speaker’s abstracts for the upcoming Equine History Conference: Why Equine History Matters. Register now!

Rather Risk His Life in a Carriage Than Suffer on A Mule’s Back: The Use of Burros and Mules in Defining Race
Abbie Harlow, Arizona State University

       “As draught beasts, beasts of burden, and for field labor, [mules] surpass any other animal in the world; and the use of them allows the noble horse to be applied to his own proper use … and not to field labor or the rude and sordid drudgery to which he is too often degraded.”[1]This 1857 article, “Mules and Mule-Breeding,” argued for the use of mules as draft animals in place of horses, partially because mules were better suited to field work, but also to remove “the noble horse” from labor demeaning to their status. Newspaper articles, breeding handbooks…

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#EqHist2018: Lonneke Delpeut on “The Image of the Horse in Ancient Egypt”

Equine History Collective

All month long we will be featuring speaker’s abstracts for the upcoming Equine History Conference: Why Equine History Matters. Register now!

The Image of the Horse in Ancient Egypt: A Source of Information and a Piece of Art Lonneke Delpeut, Leiden University

    The horse was introduced into ancient Egyptian society around the beginning of the New Kingdom (ca. 1600 BC). From the beginning of the 18th dynasty, we see the horse depicted in funerary temples belonging to the pharaohs as well as in superstructures of private tombs of Egypt’s elite. My research is about the two-dimensional depictions of the horse, namely the difference between the image as a source of information compared to the image as a piece of art. Every image contains a certain amount of information, and can for example tell us about how the horse is used in Egyptian society, what the Egyptians knew about…

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#EqHist2018: Breed, Purity, Race, and Class

Equine History Collective

All month long we will be featuring speaker’s abstracts for the upcoming Equine History Conference: Why Equine History Matters. Register now!

Breed, Purity, Race, & Class: Modernity’s Interconnections Between Horse & Human
Monica Mattfeld & Kristen Guest, University of Northern British Columbia

     Associated with human intervention in natural processes alongside categories of ‘purity’ and ‘impurity,’ breed has been central to the development of the contemporary horse industry via breed associations and lucrative international industries such as Thoroughbred racing. Yet, as the work of Harriet Ritvo (Animal Estate), Donna Landry (Noble Brutes), Richard Nash (‘Honest English Breed’), Sandra Swart (Riding High), and Margaret Derry (Bred for Perfection; Horses in Society)—among many others—variously demonstrates, ‘breed’ is also enmeshed in the history of human identity. Perhaps most importantly, notions of equine breed have evolved alongside core human categories of identity such as nation, race, class and gender. As Karen Raber…

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#EqHist2018 is Approaching at a Gallop!

Equine History Collective

   Follow us all month long for a sneak preview of the fantastic talks we have lined up for the Equine History Conference 2018: Why Equine History Matters at the W.K. Kellogg Arabian Horse Library Nov. 30- Dec. 2, 2018. Every day, we will post a new speaker profile with their abstract. Registration is closing soon, don’t miss out!

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Image: Gallop, 2009 by Clarice Smith, at the NSLM

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#MemberMonday: #EqHist2018 Keynote Richard Nash

Equine History Collective

OLYMPUS DIGITAL CAMERAWe are pleased to announce our keynote speaker for Equine History 2018, Dr. Richard Nash. His work likely needs no introduction, including “‘Honest English Breed:’ The Thoroughbred as Cultural Metaphor,”  in The Culture of the Horse: Status, Discipline, and Identity in the Early Modern World, one of the works that reinvigorated the field of equine history.

PhD, University of Virginia, English

What got you into history, and into equine history?

   I have only worked two places in my life: the university and the racetrack; my parents were both English professors who met in their first year of teaching at the University of Louisville at a New Faculty mixer at Churchill Downs.  As my webpage indicates, my developing interest in theorizing nature-culture hybridity as integral to understanding “modernity” directed my attention to combining my two lifelong interests by studying the role of the creation of…

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#MemberMonday: Alexandre Blaineau

More amazing academics in the field of Equine History!-

Equine History Collective

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Alexandre Blaineau

PhD European University of Brittany,
Greek History

What got you in to history ?
   I am interested on the civilizations of the Mediterranean sea, especially the Greek civilization, whose ways of thinking and culture are powerful elements of reflection.


In to equine history ?
   I started working on Xenophon before becoming interested in equine history. Then, the two equestrian treatises of the Athenian author were the object of my interest. My PhD was about horses and riders in Xenophon’s works. Equine history is a vast field of study because it deals with the history of technology, social history, economic history, social history, cultural history… I am convinced that we must work in interdisciplinarity to better understand horses as “actors” of history.

Who is your favorite historical horse ?
Bucephalus ! [A popular answer! Kat Boniface & Chelsea Shields-Más answered likewise]

What are you working on right now…

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